Women and Dieting in America

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It’s no secret that American women are obsessed with dieting. Everywhere we turn a new diet product is luring us with its supposed thigh-slimming power. We are taught that with enough determination and willpower (and perhaps a magic pill), anyone can look like a supermodel in ten days. We are told that all we have to do is follow the guidelines of whatever hot new “celebrity diet” is stealing the headlines this week.

Americans in general seem to have lost all perspective on what constitutes a healthy diet. We define “diet” as a method of food restriction for weight loss rather than as a combination of food choices and eating habits. We starve ourselves to lose a few pounds, then get hungry and tired and gain it all back and more. And so continues our quest for a quick fix to solve our weight gain woes.

As a result, young generations are not being taught how to practice moderation and healthy dietary habits. Instead, an undue amount of emphasis is being placed on physical appearance and unrealistic weight loss goals.

I was 11 when I started dieting. I was a skinny, energetic waif of a child, but I decided early on that my thighs were too big. My mother, aunts and older sister were all focused on dieting and weight loss and I felt that cutting calories was the “grown up” thing to do. A few months later I was diagnosed with severe, acute anorexia nervosa. I’ve struggled ever since.

I am now nearly 26 and fighting to rebound from my most recent relapse. I am encountering renal, thyroid and nervous system damage. I have osteoporosis.

And so if the “success” of a diet is determined by the number of pounds lost, would it not follow that plummeting to 66 pounds at 5’6″ would have scored me an A+? My kidneys don’t think so. Many women in different countries are suffering from weight management problem. The number of pounds should be great when important information is gathered from https://www.artofwarquotes.com/leptitox-review/ site. The people will attain success in the reduction of the weight. The selection of the right product should be done without any management problem. 

It is true that eating disorders really are about food or weight, but about an all-consuming lack of self-worth. It is also true that, combined with predisposing factors, society’s emphasis on body weight has a profound impact on the development of the poor self-image that precipitates such disordered eating.

It is my belief that nearly all women in this country struggle with disordered thought processes regarding food, weight and/or body image. Perhaps not every woman develops behaviors that are extreme enough to merit the label of a textbook-defined eating disorder, but underlying thought patterns are unhealthy nonetheless.

In general, women need to redefine what is a successful diet. A diet is not a temporary, expedient method of shedding unwanted pounds. A diet is a lifestyle choice, the success of which is indicated by good health and overall well-being.

Above all, it is absolutely crucial that we change our attitude so that self-worth is no longer determined by a number on the scale.

Carlo

About Post Author

Carlo

Carlo Ybarra is an entrepreneur, writer and photographer. He has been working for Pad Mare Sort Bali for 5 years and counting as the senior content editor.
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